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Tesco to use unsold bread in new products


Britain’s largest supermarket chain is launching a drive to reduce food waste from bread by turning unsold baguettes and batons from its in-store bakeries into new products.

Surplus bread is one of the biggest waste problems for food retailers, according to the government’s food waste adviser Wrap, particularly from freshly baked lines which have a short shelf life.

Its most recent figures show surplus bakery products account for nearly a third (67,500 tonnes) of the UK’s total retail food waste a year. Bread is the second most wasted food in the home, with an estimated 1m loaves thrown away each day. It is also one of the most wasted items at every stage of the supply chain.

Britain’s largest supermarket chain is launching a drive to reduce food waste from bread by turning unsold baguettes and batons from its in-store bakeries into new products.

Surplus bread is one of the biggest waste problems for food retailers, according to the government’s food waste adviser Wrap, particularly from freshly baked lines which have a short shelf life.

Its most recent figures show surplus bakery products account for nearly a third (67,500 tonnes) of the UK’s total retail food waste a year. Bread is the second most wasted food in the home, with an estimated 1m loaves thrown away each day. It is also one of the most wasted items at every stage of the supply chain.

“This initiative from Tesco is an excellent example of a simple solution to a common problem,” said David Moon, the head of business collaboration at Wrap. “Using surpluses in store to make a delicious new product saves good food from spoiling and reduces the cost of waste to the business.”

Elsewhere in the supply chain, leftover bread was increasingly being used to make beer: breweries including social enterprise Toast Ale and Adnams used Marks & Spencer’s leftover factory sandwich bread crusts, while the Gail’s Bakery chain made a fresh sourdough loaf from its own unsold loaves.